Displacement and Gathering: Art Installation @FPCHollywood, 4/23-5/7 #TheTableSetters

Displacement and Gathering: Spring Art Exhibition April 23-May 7, 2017

First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood, Art Gallery

1760 N. Gower

Hollywood, CA 90028

The philosopher Jacques Derrida relates the way the alien in our midst questions long-held assumptions, norms, and customs. This could lead to acts of hostility or hospitality. Through a cluster of art installations at FPCH near Carlos Street entrances to the sanctuary, the poetic becomes the means to metaphorically display the way the strange and the stranger, variety and form, enables possibilities for insights and assists in welcoming what is other. This includes opening participants to the mystery of the Triune God. This notion is explored in Hyung-in Kim’s collection of braids showing how three differing fabrics can interweave to become one strong and beautiful cord. Besides relating the oneness and diversity of God, the braid also speaks of human ethnic and racial diversity tied together to create new cultural forms and unions. Furthermore, the visual elements of displacement and gathering characterized in these installations bears affinity to a major theme that runs throughout Scripture: the hope for accord amid human alienation from God, others, and the land. Visit installations by Anne Baumgartner, Brian Fee, Maria Fee, Andrea Kraybill, Hyung-in Kim, and Marvin Wadlow. Most of these artists will be available for conversation on May 7th after 11:00am service, 12:00pm-2:00pm.

#TBT: Matthew gets BUSTED for his Whiteousness!

Matthew tells his story at The Secret Society Of Twisted Storytellers, Friday, October 21, 2016, “BUSTED!” at Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. Performing Artists Curated by Gina Ellis. Hosted by Satori Shakoor, http://www.satorishakoor.com, Videographer/Editor, 248 Pencils, Inc. http://www.248pencils.com, Don Wellman, Prema Qadir, Camera, Larry Martin, Camera, Jatu Gray, LiveStream Camera

#TBT: Behind The Scenes, and Action!

From the fall of 2016. After debating over whether Jesse Corti (a mutual friend from Hollywood Presbyterian Church) did, or did not, play the Teacup in Beauty and the Beast, Isaac works on delivering his lines. There is a tension, and therein lies a perfect table setting: does Isaac say his lines, written by Andre Henry, as forcefully as he feels them? Or does he risk coming across as the “angry black male?”

A few weeks ago, we heard Ivy weigh in on what this taught her, scroll back to that post on 3/2/17

Isaac’s reflections were on 3/9/17.